free webpage hit counter
Ship Costa Rica alternate

Evermarine new graphic
A.M.
Costa Rica

Your daily
English-language 

news source
Monday through Friday

Tico Travel
(506) 2223-1327             Published  Tuesday, March 2, 2010,  in Vol. 10, No. 42      E-mail us
Sports
Calendar
Jo Stuart
Classifieds
Real Estate
Entertainment
About us

Monteverde creatures were victims of fungus
Frog's demise blamed on El Niño, not warming

By the Colombia University news service

Global warming did not kill the Monteverde golden toad, an often cited example of climate-triggered extinction, says a new study.  The toad vanished from Costa Rica’s Pacific coastal-mountain cloud forest in the late 1980s, the apparent victim of a pathogen outbreak that has wiped out dozens of other amphibians in the Americas. Many researchers have linked outbreaks of the deadly chytrid fungus to climate change, but the new study asserts that the weather patterns, at Monteverde at least, were not out of the ordinary.

The role that climate change played in the toad’s demise has been fiercely debated in recent years. The new paper, in the Monday issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the latest to weigh in. In the study, researchers used old-growth trees from the Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve to reconstruct moisture levels in that region over the last century. They expected to see global warming manifested in the form of a long-term warming or drying trend, but instead discovered that the forest’s dry spells closely tracked El Niño, the periodic and natural warming of waters off South America that brings drought to some places and added rainfall and snow to others.

The golden toad vanished after an exceptionally dry season following the 1986-1987 El Niño, probably not long after the chytrid fungus was introduced. Scientists speculate that dry conditions caused the toads to congregate in a small number of puddles to reproduce, prompting the disease to spread rapidly. Some have linked the dry spell to global warming, arguing that warmer temperatures allowed the chytrid pathogen to flourish and weakened the toad’s defenses. The new study finds that Monteverde was the driest it’s been in a hundred years following the 1986-1987 El Niño, but that those dry conditions were still within the range of normal climate variability. The study does not address amphibian declines elsewhere.

“There’s no comfort in knowing that the golden toad’s extinction was the result of El Niño and an introduced pathogen, because climate change will no doubt play a role in future extinctions,” said study lead author Kevin Anchukaitis, a climate scientist at Columbia University’s Lamont- Doherty Earth Observatory in New York.

Average global temperatures have climbed about 0.8 degrees C (1.4 degrees F) in the past hundred years, according to many studies, and some studies suggest that mountain regions are warming even more.

Anchukaitis sampled nearly 30 old trees in the Monteverde cloud forest before finding two whose climate data could be extracted.

In a 2006 paper in Nature, a team of U.S. and Latin American scientists linked rising tropical temperatures to the disappearance of 64 amphibian species in Central and South America. They proposed that warmer temperatures, associated with greater cloud cover, had led to cooler days and warmer nights, creating conditions that allowed the chytrid fungus to grow and spread. The fungus kills frogs and toads by releasing poison and attacking their skin and teeth.  “Disease is the bullet killing frogs, but climate change is pulling the trigger,” the lead author of the Nature study and a research scientist at the Monteverde reserve, J. Alan Pounds, said at the time.

The new study suggests that it was El Niño — not climate change — that caused the fungus to thrive, killing the golden toad. “El Niño pulled the trigger,” said Anchukaitis.

Proving a link between climate change and biodiversity loss is difficult because so many overlapping factors may be at play, including habitat destruction, introduction of disease, pollution and normal weather variability. This is especially true in the tropics, because written weather records may go back only a few decades, preventing researchers from spotting long-term trends.
Golden frog
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Monteverde golden toad

Monteverde trees
Colombia University/Jorge Porras
Kevin Anchukaitis with one of the 30 old trees he sampled in Monteverde.

In the last decade, scientists have improved techniques for reconstructing past climate from tiny samples of wood drilled from tropical trees. Unlike trees in northern latitudes, tropical trees may grow year round, and often do not form the sharply defined growth rings that help scientists differentiate wet years from dry years in many temperate-region species. But even in the tropics, weather can leave an imprint on growing trees. During the dry season, trees take up water with more of the heavy isotope, oxygen-18, than oxygen-16. By analyzing the isotope ratio of the tree’s wood, scientists can reconstruct the periods of rainfall and relative humidity throughout its life.

On two field trips to Costa Rica, Anchukaitis sampled nearly 30 trees, looking for specimens old enough, and with enough annual growth, to be studied. Back in the lab, he and study co-author Michael Evans, a climate scientist at University of Maryland, analyzed thousands of samples of wood trimmed to the size of pencil shavings.

Their results are only the latest challenge to the theory that climate change is driving the deadly chytrid outbreaks in the Americas. In a 2008 paper in the journal PLoS Biology, University of Maryland biologist Karen Lips mapped the loss of harlequin frogs from Costa Rica to Panamá. She found that their decline followed the step-by-step pattern of an emerging infectious disease, affecting frogs in the mountains but not the lowlands. Had the outbreak been climate-induced, she said, the decline should have moved up and down the mountains over time.

Reached by e-mail, Pounds said he disagreed with the Anchukaitis study. He said that his own 40-year rainfall and mist-cover measurements at Monteverde show a drying trend that the authors missed because they were unable to analyze moisture variations day to day or week to week. The weather is becoming more variable and extreme, he added, favoring some pathogens and making some animals more susceptible to disease.

“Anyone paying close attention to living systems in the wild is aware that our planet is in serious trouble,” he said.  “It's just a matter of time before this becomes painfully obvious to everyone.”


Today's
colon
exchange rate
HERE!
Subscribe
to our
daily digest

Search
our site

Send us
a news story

Real estate ads
Classified
ads

Tourism and
services

Display
ad info

Classified
ad info

Contact us


Resiudency in Costa Rica
Costa Travel


Whiter House Players
Pacific lots






Poderco Solar Costa Rica


Ship to Costa Rica



Merchant accounts
Hotel Casa Crystal
Puriscal Properties


New Montana ad




Grecia real estate

Sneak Pete's

Chris Howard book

Chris Howard ad for relocation

M P Realty

Mr. Secuirty

DelRey casino

Sports
Calendar
Jo Stuart
Classifieds
Real Estate
Entertainment
About us
What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier

The contents of this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007  and 2008 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for more details


A.M.
Costa Rica
Second newspage
Costa Azul
Home
Tourism
Calendar
Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us
San José, Costa Rica, Tuesday, March 2, 2010, Vol. 10, No. 42

Costa Rica Expertise
Costa Rica Expertise Ltd http://crexpertise.com E-mail info@crexpertise.com Tel:506-256-8585 Fax:506-256-7575

Vision 20/20
Spotsmens
Click HERE for great hotel discounts

Professional Directory
A.M. Costa Rica's professional directory is where business people who wish to reach the English-speaking community may invite responses. If you are interested in being represented here, please contact the editor.


Real estate agents and services

MARGARET SOHN
with Great Estates of Costa Rica

20 years Costa Rican
real estate experience

Member of the Costa Rican Real Estate Association, Lic. #1000

Member of
Costa Rican-American Chamber of Commerce

samargo@racsa.co.cr
info@realtorcostarica.com
www.realtorcostarica.com
(506)  2220-3729 &  (506)
8333-8391 cell
(506)  2232-5016 (phone/fax)
5800-7/12/10
Latitude Nine real estate graphic
Latitude 9
Real estate, development, Investments.

Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica
506 2777-1197

Over 25 years experience in Costa Rica

www.latitude9.com
55672-5/25/10

CENTURY 21 Jacó Beach Realty
A Name You Trust & Professional Service

Buying? Selling?
We Can Do It!
TOLL FREE FROM THE US
1 (877) 746-3868
  Tom Ghormley - Owner/Broker - in CR since '79

Beachfront, Views, Mountains, Lots, Farms, Beaches, Houses, Condos. Hotels, Restaurants, Projects, Commercial, Investments

www.c21jaco.com
2643-3356
Info@c21jaco.com
4401-6/9/0

Collection services

COLLECTIONS COSTA RICA
The collection agency you’ve been searching for
• Receivables     • International Debt
• Comercial Collections     • Portfolio Collections
• Bad Debt Collections     • Condo HOA Collections
• Bad Check Collections     • Recovery solutions
Start early, recover more. Free quotes at
collection services
collectionscr@gmail.com
We are an attorney-based collection agency and specialize in the recovery of delinquent accounts nationwide. We work on a contingency basis or fee structure depending on the type of debt, but always fees that you can understand with no hidden costs. We recover your lost revenue quickly & professionally. Tel: 2253-3705/2283-8712   E-mail: collectionscr@gmail.com
5919-

Legal services

KEARNEY-LAWSON & Asoc.
Lic.Gregory Kearney Lawson.
Attorneys at Law and real estate brokers
Relocation services, Wedding Planning
Greg Kearney
*Investments  *Corporations
*Tax Shelters *Immigration
*Real Estate Sales in Costa Rica
*Name & Product registration
*Business procedures 
*Family and Labor Law
*Locate People   *Private Investigations
Phone/Fax: 2290-8117, 8841-0007
New location on Rohrmoser Blvd.
 Phone: (506) 2232-1014


Burke Fiduciary, S.A.
Registered Escrow and Legal Services
Thomas A. Burke, LL.M, Glenda Burke, LL.M
Gloria Burke, manager
Burke law firm

We offer real estate law, due diligence and escrow services,residency status, business corporations, estate planning. English, Spanish, German and French spoken.
More about us at www.burkecr.com
Ph. 011 506 2267-6645
info@burkecr.com

The registration of Burke Fiduciary S.A., corporate ID 3-101-501917 with the
General Superintendence of Financial Entities (SUGEF) is not an authorization to operate. The supervision of SUGEF refers to compliance with the capital legitimization requirements of Law No. 8204. SUGEF does not supervise the
business carried out by this company, nor its security, stability or solvency.
Persons contracting its services do so for their own account and at their own risk.
5937-9/4/10

CONSULTORIA JURIDICA EMPRESARIAL CA, S.A
Attorneys & Notaries
 Tel.  2280-9692 / 2225-9322
Skype: CONJURIDICA
e-mail: info@conjuridica.com 
Web:  www.conjuridica.com
       We offer the highest professional standards with very competitive rates. All our official documentation and Notary deeds are always translated in English for better comprehension, client satisfaction and safety.
consultoria logo
• Immigration Law.
• Real Estate Law.
• Corporations, Foundations
       and Associations. 
• Trademarks & Intellectual
       Property.  
• Notary public services
• Criminal Law
•Civil & Commercial 
       Litigation
Our Law Office is conveniently located near Mall San Pedro,  350 meters south from the Subaru dealer, Los Yoses, San José.
5290-12/2/09

Appraisers

BEFORE YOU BUY and OVERPAY
Angela Jiménez
ask Angela Jiménez
Architect/Certified Appraiser
23 years experience
for Costa Rica Banks

• building inspections
•¨property management
• construction management

www.orbitcostarica.com/
certifieda.htm
5755-6/14/10

Residency experts

Residency in Costa Rica
A full service immigration agency
U.S. and San José offices
Getting and authenticating documents can be a chore —

we know how to do it. Experienced with many nationalities. Up-to-date on
Costa Rica's evolving immigration law.
Pensionado and rentista. Your first stop for smooth, professional service and a positive experience. Javier Zavaleta jzava@pacbell.net
www.residencyincostarica.com
Tel: (323) 255-6116
5495-2/17/09

Acupuncture physician

Acupuncture (disposable needles),
& Auriculotherapy (without needles) 

Immediate results guaranteed
for sport and all injuries; Back, neck, shoulder, elbow, carpal tunnel, knees, sciatica, 
Eugene McDonald
Eugene Mc Donald A.P.
migraine, T.M.J., kidney stones, intercostal neuralgia, and all painfull conditions  without drugs. Excellent results for stress, tension, anxiety, depression; and many other medical conditions and health maintenance.  Acupuncture works even if other therapies had little or no results. Free consultation, U.S. license, 19 years experience, Eugene Mc Donald, A.P (acupuncture physician) Escazú, 8352-0661. acutherapy0@hotmail.com
http://acupuncturecr.blogspot.com/
5563-3/21/10

Accountants

James Brohl, C.P.A. & M.B.A.
US Income Tax,  US GAAP Accounting
& Business Consulting

• US Tax return preparation  for
individuals and businesses
• eFile returns: secure with faster refunds
• Assist with back reporting and other filing issues
• Take advantage of the Foreign
Income Tax Exclusion (up to $
91,400 in 2009)
• Business Consulting to facilitate working in Costa Rica
• Accounting for US and International Financial Reporting


Telephone 8305-3149 or 2256-8620
E-mail jrtb_1999@racsa.co.cr
5097-3/30/10

U.S. Tax International

Plus Costa Rican taxes, accounting, and legal services
Over 15 years in Costa Rica
(English Spoken)
C.R. 2288-2201   U.S 786-206-9473
FAX: 2289-8235
E-mail: ustax@lawyer.com
Web page with vital U.S. tax info HERE!
5916-5/15/10

New traffic law enforced
as lawmakers weigh changes


By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

The new traffic law still was in a state of flux Monday even as the Policía de Tránsito set up checkpoints around the Central Valley and handed out more than 200 tickets. A number of vehicles were confiscated when drivers were found not to have valid licenses. In other cases, officers removed license plates from vehicles that had not been inspected for safety or which failed to have a valid road tax or marchamo sticker.

At the legislature, at least 12 lawmakers ducked the session that was supposed to get a start on making changes in the law.

Some said that a consensus was emerging on some items, such as reducing fines for non-life threatening faults. But lawmakers still were deadlocked over the level of alcohol in the blood that would constitute drunk driving.

The lawmakers who did show up handled 24 different motions of which 10 were approved. There are 213 motions on the table.

The actual content of the approved changes are not readily available. Lawmakers estimated that the consideration of the motions will last until at least the first two days of next week.

In the meantime, motorists who were ticketed Monday can hope that the violations they face will be among those for which lawmakers choose to reduce the fines.

Jorge Méndez, one lawmaker, said that he and his colleagues are inclined to cut the fines for violations that are not related directly to risk of human life. He mentioned reckless driving, which is one of the few sections of the traffic code that has been in force for more than a year.  For other violations, lawmakers might cut the fine by 50 percent. He mentioned parking next to a yellow line or driving with a burned out bulb.

In addition lawmakers may decide to increase the points that can be accumulated before a driver loses the license. Now the total is 50, but there is a movement to increase that total to 200, lawmakers said. They expressed concern for those persons who have to drive for a living and may lose their job is they lose the license. Some typical violations cost a driver 15 points as well as a fine.

The number of points is a controversial issue, as well as the level of alcohol permitted. The options are .5 grams of alcohol per liter of blood or .75 grams per liter, the difference between three and four beers for the average male. Some lawmakers also think that police should not confiscate the vehicle of a drunk driver if the individual has not caused an accident.


Sportsfishing competition
starts in Carrillo Thursday


By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

Competition sportsfishermen will be in Carrillo this week for the 2010 Presidential Challenge of Central America.

The tournament begins Thursday with a rules meeting at Villas Playa Sámara. The sponsor, The Billfish Foundation, said that 14 teams have registered. The bulk of the boats are coming from Costa Rican ports.

"The Carrillo area is widely renowned for its marlin fishing, with Pacific blue, striped and black marlin all found here during this time of year, alongside the usually plentiful Pacific sailfish," said the foundation. "The opportunities for a Pacific grand slam of three different billfish species are quite good here."

Tournament rules mandate three anglers per team, each fishing one rod loaded with Berkley 20-pound test line, the foundation said, noting that circle hooks are also mandatory in Costa Rica. This type of hook allows quick release of the captured fish.

The event ends Sunday with an awards dinner.


Presidential vote is official

By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

There were no surprises as the Tribunal Supremo de Elecciones declared Laura Chinchilla Miranda the next president of Costa Rica. The report came as a decision by the tribunal magistrates Monday.

The decision said that the Partido Liberación Nacional had gained 896,516 votes in the presidential race of the 1,911,333 valid votes cast.

Also listed in the decree were Ms. Chinchilla's two vice presidents: Alfio Piva Mesén and Luis Liberman Ginsburg.

Ms. Chinchilla and her running mates take office May 8.


Have you seen these stories?




Top story feeds are disabled on archived pages.








A.M. Costa Rica guide

This is a brief users guide to A.M. Costa Rica.

Old pages
Each day someone complains via e-mail that the newspages are from yesterday or the day before. A.M. Costa Rica staffers check every page and every link when the newspaper is made available at 2 a.m. each weekday.

So the problem is with the browser in each reader's computer. Particularly when the connection with the  server is slow, a computer will look to the latest page in its internal memory and serve up that page.

Readers should refresh the page and, if necessary, dump the cache of their computer, if this problem persists. Readers in Costa Rica have this problem frequently because the local Internet provider has continual problems.

Searching
The A.M. Costa Rica search page has a list of all previous editions by date and a space to search for specific words and phrases. The search will return links to archived pages.

Newspages
A typical edition will consist of a front page and four other newspages. Each of these pages can be reached by links near the top and bottom of the pages.

Classifieds
Five classified pages are updated daily. Employment listings are free, as are listings for accommodations wanted, articles for sale and articles wanted. The tourism page and the real estate sales and real estate rentals are updated daily.

Advertising information
A summary of advertising rates and sizes are available for display and classifieds.

Contacting us
Both the main telephone number and the editor's e-mail address are listed on the front page near the date.

Visiting us
Directions to our office and other data, like bank account numbers are on the about us page.

newspaper nameplante
Del Rey casino

Home
Tourism
Place
classified ad

Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us

What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007  and 2008 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details


EODT ad for February 15
Good Grief!
You still are spending
half your ad budget
on paper?

You better call us!


A.M.
Costa Rica
third newspage

Brenes lawyers
Home
Tourism
Calendar
Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us
San José, Costa Rica, Tuesday, March 2, 2010, Vol. 10, No. 42

Tourists can stay for one year without leaving, Zamora says
By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

Under the new immigration law, tourists will be able to stay in Costa Rica for a full year without having to leave the country. Instead, they will be able to renew their tourist visa three times here for additional 90-day stays, according to Mario Zamora, the immigration director.

Each renewal will cost $100, he noted. After three renewals, the tourist will have to leave Costa Rica, although they could quickly return with a new tourism visa, he said.

Zamora also said that he was in error when he told a reporter that rules would be changing for the so-called perpetual tourists. A.M. Costa Rica reported the incorrect information Feb. 19 and attributed it to Zamora.

Friday Zamora blamed himself for saying that tourists would not be able to go to the same country twice to renew
their visa and that after two trips to renew a visa a tourist
 will have to stay out of Costa Rica for a minimum of 15 days. He gave no explanation for why he made the error, but suggested that he may not be totally familiar with the new immigration law.

The news report generates some concern among Costa Rica's perpetual tourist population.

Zamora also said in an interview Friday that the regulations for the new immigration law should be ready to publish in 15 days. However, he said the law, which went into effect Monday, was written in detail and that the regulations are not extensive.

He noted that the prior immigration law operated for nearly four years without regulations being published. The new immigration law only says that tourists can renew their visas by paying $100. Not in the law is the limit on renewing the visa just three times. Presumably that will be contained in the regulations, but Zamora did not say this.


Avenida Central hosts vendors in several rows until the municipal police arrive for a daily chase.

street vendors
A.M. Costa Rica/Manuel Avendaño Arce

It's cops vs. vendors in the daily drama along the boulevards
By Manuel Avendaño Arce.
of the A.M. Costa Rica staff

Every day there are at least two clashes between street vendors and the Policia Municipal. The San José police officers, themselves, admit that each month the number of vendors on the downtown pedestrian boulevard and other similar streets increases.

The law prohibits using the boulevards and other public places for street sales. Police are having trouble enforcing this edict because each month there are from 11 to 16 new vendors.

The vendors frequently play a cat-and-mouse game and roll up their wares when they see police approaching. Still, there have been violent skirmishes between police and vendors.

The bulk of the enforcement falls to the municipal police, that force numbers just 200 police against an estimated 800 vendors. Sometimes the confrontations get so intense that the Fuerza Pública tactical squad joins in.

Tourists and visitors have mixed feelings about the situation.

Around 3:15 p.m. Monday, Ryan Macy, an Australian tourist, was walking on the boulevard. He said that San
José is a very small capital and very welcoming, but space here in some places is very narrow and impassable because there are vendors on both sides of the boulevard.

Macy also said that visitors can find inexpensive goods or souvenirs,  But he said he believes the municipality should have more control over this activity.

At 3:25 p.m., in front of the Banco Central building where a large number of vendors congregated, municipal policemen arrived. Some 11 officers were ready to run after at least 20 vendors who quickly packed their bags and their goods when an associate gave an alert. This prompted a chase.  If caught, vendors can have their wares confiscated.

At 3:30 p.m., in the midst of the confrontation between police and vendors, Steve Bradley and his wife were eating at a restaurant on the boulevard. They got up from their seats to watch what was happening.

Bradley said it was all a "show at coffee hour." He said he was annoyed to see this happen every day, often until 4 or 5 p.m. The situation always is the same, he said: police officers behind the vendors. "I've seen fighting with stones and guns," he said. "I have seen ladies get beaten and bloodied in the clashes, and they are just people walking on Avenida Central.


Del Rey casino

You need to see Costa Rican tourism information HERE!

Home
Tourism
Place
classified ad

Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us

What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007  and 2008 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details


A.M. Costa Rica
fourth news page


Home
Tourism
Calendar
Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us
San José, Costa Rica, Tuesday, March 2, 2010, Vol. 10, No. 42


ICE told to give Amnet access to undersea Internet cable

By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

The telecom regulator has ordered the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad to let an Internet competitor have access to the Maya 1 undersea cable.

The order favors Dodona SRL, known commercially as Amnet. Amnet is setting up its own independent Internet operation. In the past, Amnet was simply a connection to the Radiográfica Costarricense S.A. computer, which then connected to the company known as ICE and then to one of two undersea cables.

Amnet customers paid that private company a monthly fee and then paid a similar fee to Radiográfica Costarricense. Now the users do not have to have two accounts.
The decision by the Superintendencia de Telecomunicaciones is consistent with the goal of providing access to telephone and Internet operators.

This is the first order of access and interconnection. Amnet and other companies that are so inclined can now begin to market products that directly compete with the former government monopolies. The Superintendencia foresees additional user services, including Internet telephone.

The law says that companies seeking interconnectivity have three months to reach an accord and that the telecom authority will step in after that time and define the terms under which companies can interconnect.  The order will remain in force until the companies reach their own contract,



Rule for use of manual transmissions for driving test being challenged

By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

The Sala IV constitutional court is being asked to throw out a decree that says those taking tests for an automobile license must use a vehicle with a manual transmission.

The Ministerio de Obras Pública y Transportes engineered a decree stipulating manual transmission in October 2008.

Rosaura Montero, a vice minister, said at the time that the decree was emitted because transport officials want to
make sure that new drivers are able, for example, to hold a vehicle on a hill by working the clutch and accelerator. She said that many drivers have taken the exam using a vehicle with an automatic transmission and then went on the roads with a manual shift car.

A woman identified as Ericka Segura Escalante and others are challenging the decree on constitutional grounds. The Poder Judicial noted that the appeal had been submitted.

There is no indication when or if the Sala IV will act on it.



Home
Tourism
Place
classified ad

Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us

What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007  and 2008 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details



A.M.
Costa Rica
fifth news page
Electric cars
Home
Tourism
Calendar
Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us
San José, Costa Rica, Tuesday, March 2, 2010, Vol. 10, No. 42

Medical vacations in Costa Rica

Illegal bars closed down
in weekend police sweep


By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

The underground economy includes what are basically speakeasies where untaxed alcohol, frequently from Panamá, can reduce significantly the price of the morning after.

The illicit bars sometimes are in the news during Semana Santa when legal sale of alcohol is prohibited. But in poorer areas the illegal bar is a year-round phenomenon.

The Fuerza Pública shut down five such operations over the weekend in La Carpio, the low-income neighborhood in La Uruca. They said they confiscated 2,270 bottles of alcohol.

In Pavas, there was the legal establishment that had police problems. The Fuerza Pública said that three licensed establishments were shut down due to paperwork problems.

New study questions
E. coli as an indicator


By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

A new study reported in Ireland suggests that pollution studies of water near the country's tourist beaches might be flawed.

Beaches such as Tamarindo and Jacó have gotten some bad press over the last three years due to excessive amounts of E. coli bacteria in the ocean near the beaches. E. coli is an indicator of pollution because scientists believe that the organisms do not live long outside human hosts.

Not so, according to a report in the the Teagasc Research and Innovation magazine. The research by Teagasc Johnstown Castle Environment Research Centre and NUI Galway said that E. coli can survive in soil for as long as nine years.

“This has important implications for the indicator status of E. coli, suggesting that the presence of E. coli in surface or groundwaters may not be indicative of recent fecal contamination,” explained researcher Fiona Brennan.

E. coli’s ability to survive for prolonged periods of time in soil may compromise its use as the sole indicator of fecal contamination of water, said the research report. In other words, the E. coli in the oceans may have come from the nearby soil and not from sewage.


For your international reading pleasure:


News of Nicaragua
News of Central America
News of Cuba
News of Venezuela
News of Colombia
News of El Salvador

News of Honduras
News of the Dominican Republic
News of Panamá


News from the BBC up to the minute




BBC news and sports feeds are disabled on archived pages.
BBC sports news up to the minute



Casa Alfi Hotel

Home
Tourism
Place
classified ad

Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us

What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007  and 2008 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details
 

A.M. Costa Rica
sixth news page

For your international reading pleasure:

News of Nicaragua
News of Central America
News of Cuba
News of Venezuela
News of Colombia
News of El Salvador

News of Honduras
News of the Dominican Republic
News of Panamá
Home
Tourism
Calendar
Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us
San José, Costa Rica, Tuesday, March 2, 2010, Vol. 10, No. 42


Latin American news
Please reload page if feed does not appear promptly
Our reader's opinion
New highway is dangerous,
Quepos resident reports


Dear A.M. Costa Rica:

Upon my arrival to Costa Rica Feb. 18 I had made specific plans to use the new road to Orotina and forgo my normal 20-minute flight to Quepos.

Boy was I disappointed. I do not understand how something could have been done to the unsuspecting populous that this road will affect.

I told my driver whom I have used for several years that this is going to be a dangerous place when the rainy season arrives: Landslides galore, not very good use of the toll plazas and a very dangerous road.

Knowing one of the first fatalities as he was from the Quepos area, I personally inspected the road. Any person familiar with the Costa Rican rainy season could see this impending disaster. Why couldn’t the powers-that-be?

Who was in charge of this work? I have some practical knowledge of building roads in Costa Rica, and I would have expected a much better job and end product. Watch the problems begin as I am sure much more mayhem is coming.

This truly amazes me.
Mike Michael
Quepos/Atlanta

Rain and clouds in forecast
for Central Valley today


By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

More rain is predicted for this afternoon in the Central Valley and on the Pacific coast. The Instituto Meteorológico Nacional said that humidity and weaker winds are factors that will dominate the day with growing cloud cover in the late morning and afternoon.

Rain was inconsistent Monday. San José residents were watching the dark clouds and betting if rain would come. It did not. But in La Garita and in Heredia 24 mm or nearly an inch of rain fell between 3 and 5 p.m. Some winds damaged the roof of two homes in Heredia.

Isolated rains are predicted today for the Caribbean coast and northern zone.




Latin American news feeds are disabled on archived pages.


Home
Tourism
Place
classified ad

Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us

What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007  and 2008 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details