free webpage hit counter
Ship Costa Rica alternate

Joya Prfecta
A.M.
Costa Rica

Your daily
English-language 

news source
Monday through Friday

Pacific lots of Costa Rica
(506) 2223-1327         Published Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010,  in Vol. 10, No. 202            E-mail us
Sports
Calendar
Jo Stuart
Classifieds
Real Estate
Entertainment
About us


Rewards offered for turning in crooked U.S. firms
By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

An organization that fights corporate wrongdoing is looking for consultants in Costa Rica.

The organization is the Anti-Corruption Alliance, which seeks to encourage and help those who would be whistleblowers about corporate bribery and corruption.

Individuals who report such criminal activities, from here or from the United States, are eligible for rewards from 10 to 30 percent of the amount the U.S. goivernment collects, the organization said.

The program grew out of the 2,300-page Dodd-Frank Act, the Wall Street financial reform package that just passed the U.S. Congress.

The measure is named after Sen. Chris Dodd and Rep. Barney Frank, both of whom are not exactly ethical paragons.

According to Larry Morton of the Anti-Corruption Aliance, the organization seeks assistance in Costa Rica. It already is in a number of other foreign countries. However, the reward payments are limited to information on firms that have some contact with the U.S. Security and Exchange Commission, known as the SEC.

In an e-mail message, Morton said that "The Dodd-Frank Act covers any company traded on a U.S. exchange regardless of whether it is domestic or a foreign (i.e. Siemens or Daimler that is traded secondarily on a U.S. exchange). Any subsidiary, affiliate or joint venture of a traded company that engages in corruption or bribery in Costa Rica is eligible under the Dodd-Frank Act. The reward money absolutely comes from the companies that settle the claims, many of which are in the hundreds of millions of dollars."

The U.S. already had the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which figured in the continuing bribery allegation against former president Míguel Ángel Rodriguez Echeverría. However, that law does not provide for generous rewards to whistleblowers.
corruption
A.M. Costa Rica graphic

The organizaiton does not share in the rewards, but it said it has relationships with lawyers around the globe who initially work for free to get a piece of the final settlement.

The settlements can run into the hundreds of millions of dollars. Whistleblowers share in a percentage, from 10 to 30, of all money collected over the first million, according to the bill.

Proponents of the bill say that the measure will encourage companies to report their own violations. Detractors say that employees will try to race the company in reporting violations for the reward.

Probably the most up-to-date list of U.S. companies and subsidiaries doing business here is the membership data base of the Costa Rican-American Chamber of Commerce, known as AMCHAM. The list is not exhaustive.

For financial reasons and trade purposes some wholly Costa Rican corporations are incorporated in the United States and listed on U.S. stock exchanges. They would be covered by the law.


Today's
colon
exchange rate
HERE!
Subscribe
to our
daily digest

Search
our site

Send us
a news story

Real estate ads
Classified
ads

Tourism and
services

Display
ad info

Classified
ad info

Contact us
Fishing teaser

Del Rey page one

GLC replacement
Goool sports bar update


Costa Azul
exotic property tours
Costa Rica MD

new Ship to Costa Rica ad

Resiudency in Costa Rica
Costa Travel

Las Olas

Colinas de Miramar

rss feed graphic
Twitter link
Facebook graphic


Take it to the
next level, Bet
sporting
events
world wide with us

Live Casino
Sportsbook
& More
Chris Howard's relocation tour
Dental clinic
Association of Residents of Costa Rica

New Smiles Dental

Sports
Calendar
Jo Stuart
Classifieds
Real Estate
Entertainment
About us
What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier

The contents of this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2010 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for more details


90210 dental clinic

Costacan new rollover

A.M. Costa Rica's Second news page

Home
Tourism
Calendar
Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us

San José, Costa Rica, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010, Vol. 10, No. 202

Costa Rica Expertise
Costa Rica Expertise Ltd http://crexpertise.com E-mail info@crexpertise.com Tel:506-256-8585 Fax:506-256-7575

Pure LIfe Development
Sportsmen's Lodge

Professional Directory
A.M. Costa Rica's professional directory is where business people who wish to reach the English-speaking community may invite responses. If you are interested in being represented here, please contact the editor.


Translator

We will translate your documents from English into Spanish or Spanish to English
Rosa Monge
Rosa Maria Monge
Legal problems?
Tired of getting the
     runaround?
Tired of excuses?
Tired of being kept in the
    dark?
Afraid of signing documents in Spanish that you do not understand?
Rosa Maria Monge, interpreter in court,
simultaneous translator, paralegal
Cell 8919-4545 or e-mail 
Contact us today to find out how we can help you.
We get results!
6367-10/22/10

Dentistry
Marco Cavallini & Associates
Dental Implants $500, Crowns $250

Dr. Marco A. Muñoz Cavallini has placed and restored
DR. Cavallini
Dr. Marco A. Muñoz Cavallini
over 12,000 dental implants since 1980. The Dr. Marco Muñoz Cavallini Dental Clinic, is recognized as one of the best practices in Dental Reconstruction, Dental Implant placement and Cosmetic Dentistry in Costa Rica and the World. For more information, visit us today at: aestheticdentistrycr.com
6094-xxxxx


Appraisers

BEFORE YOU BUY and OVERPAY
Angela Jiménez
ask Angela Jiménez
Architect/Certified Appraiser
23 years experience
for Costa Rica Banks
  
• building inspections
•¨property management
• construction advice and design
• remodeling advice
• certified appraisals
  
www.orbitcostarica.com/
certifieda.htm
6235-12/14/10


Hearing consultant

Allan Weinberg
your American hearing consultant
Now offering the smaller, better and less expensive hearing aid
from Widex, their best ever.

A fraction of U.S. prices. No more background noise, feedback or echoing and a lifetime of service.
 
8891-8989
allan9000@gmail.com
We service U.S. veterans
Clinica Dinamarca 10 clinics
www.clinicadinamarca.com
6124-6/17/10
Weinberg
Allan Weinberg


Accountants

U.S. Tax International

Plus Costa Rican taxes, accounting, and legal services
Over 15 years in Costa Rica
(English Spoken)
C.R. 2288-2201   U.S 786-206-9473
FAX: 2289-8235
E-mail: ustax@lawyer.com
Web page with vital U.S. tax info HERE!
6348-11/18/100

James Brohl, C.P.A. & M.B.A.
US Income Tax,  US GAAP Accounting
& Business Consulting

• US Tax return preparation  for
individuals and businesses
• eFile returns: secure with faster refunds
• Assist with back reporting and other filing issues
• Take advantage of the Foreign
Income Tax Exclusion (up to $
91,400 in 2009)
• Business Consulting to facilitate working in Costa Rica
• Accounting for US and International Financial Reporting


Telephone 8305-3149 or 2256-8620
E-mail jrtb_1999@racsa.co.cr
6023-3/30/11



Residency experts

Residency in Costa Rica
A full service immigration agency
U.S. and San José offices
Getting and authenticating documents can be a chore —

we know how to do it. Experienced with many nationalities. Up-to-date on
Costa Rica's evolving immigration law.
Pensionado and rentista. Your first stop for smooth, professional service and a positive experience. Javier Zavaleta jzava@pacbell.net
www.residencyincostarica.com
Tel: (323) 255-6116
6361-3/2/11


Legal services

CONSULTORIA JURIDICA EMPRESARIAL CA, S.A
Attorneys & Notaries
 Tel.  2280-9692 / 2225-9322
Skype: CONJURIDICA
e-mail: info@conjuridica.com 
Web:  www.conjuridica.com
       We offer the highest professional standards with very competitive rates. All our official documentation and Notary deeds are always translated in English for better comprehension, client satisfaction and safety.
consultoria logo
• Immigration Law.
• Real Estate Law.
• Corporations, Foundations
       and Associations. 
• Trademarks & Intellectual
       Property.  
• Notary public services
• Criminal Law
•Civil & Commercial 
       Litigation
Our Law Office is conveniently located near Mall San Pedro,  350 meters south from the Subaru dealer, Los Yoses, San José.
6163-112/8/10
5903-2/17/11

KEARNEY-LAWSON & Asoc.
Lic.Gregory Kearney Lawson.
Attorneys at Law and real estate brokers
Relocation services, Wedding Planning
Greg Kearney
*Investments  *Corporations
*Tax Shelters *Immigration
*Real Estate Sales in Costa Rica
*Name & Product registration
*Business procedures 
*Family and Labor Law
*Locate People   *Private Investigations
Phone/Fax: 2290-8117, 8841-0007
New location on Rohrmoser Blvd.
 Phone: (506) 2232-1014
6286-3/17/11

Real estate agents and services

MARGARET SOHN
with Great Estates of Costa Rica

20 years Costa Rican
real estate experience

Member of the Costa Rican Real Estate Association, Lic. #1000

Member of
Costa Rican-American Chamber of Commerce

info@realtorcostarica.com
www.realtorcostarica.com
(506)  2220-3729 &  (506)
8333-8391 cell
(506)  2232-5016 (phone/fax)
586236-1/12/11

Latitude Nine real estate graphic
Latitude 9
Real Estate, Development, Investments.

Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica
506 2777-1197

Over 25 years experience in Costa Rica

www.latitude9.com
55672-5/25/10

CENTURY 21 Jacó Beach Realty
A Name You Trust & Professional Service

Buying? Selling?
We Can Do It!
TOLL FREE FROM THE US
1 (877) 746-3868
  Tom Ghormley - Owner/Broker - in CR since '79

Beachfront, Views, Mountains, Lots, Farms, Beaches, Houses, Condos. Hotels, Restaurants, Projects, Commercial, Investments

www.c21jaco.com
2643-3356
Info@c21jaco.com
4401-6/9/0

Our readers' opinions
Neighbor confirms status
of Arenal wireless service


Dear A.M. Costa Rica:

To second what my neighbor and friend, Tom Ploskina, has written, the nice people at our local Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad office do try, but there is obviously something wrong with a company that cannot give its employees any direction, or allow any room for initiative. 

Essentially, as Tom’s letter says, it was one of the desk people there who finally admitted to me just last week that the reason for our recent fall off in service is faulty equipment in their tower. They further told me that the equipment is from the same manufacturer as the data card/modems that they have foisted on us, and ICE cannot (or will not fix it). 

They said they are waiting for representatives of the Chinese manufacturer to come to town (but can’t say when) to hopefully repair or replace whatever is faulty.

Meanwhile, as Tom also pointed out, they cannot or will not offer us a refund of money (since they are not delivering what we are being charged for), nor will they prorate our lousy service to try to make up for their shortcomings.

Ultimately, and as Tom also said, we have no choice, but if we ever get one, you can bet we’ll be looking hard.

John G. Dungan
Aguacate de Tilaran


Another unhappy customer
of Kolbi in Osa peninsula

Dear A.M. Costa Rica:

Regarding Tom Ploskina's letter to the editor, subscribers to ICE's Kolbi wireless service on Osa peninsula are also suffering continually degrading service.  I signed up for the fastest service at ICE's Puerto Jiménez office earlier this year.  For the first few months, I got what I paid for, but since then I've noticed a continual diminishing of both upload and download speeds, especially download.   All things being what they're supposed to be, upload speeds should be much less than download speeds.  When download speeds are much lower than upload, it's a sign of over subscription for a wireless infrastructure and not some problem with a local tower configuration.

Last month, I notified my local ICE office personnel who are always friendly and accommodating and asked them to pass my complaint up the chain of command.  It has since degraded to the point where I won't bother using it during peak customer usage times when download speed is 0.

Like Tom, I also look forward to switching to a future competent internet provider and to dropping ICE like they drop my e-mails.
 
Gene Warneke
Canaza, Osa Peninsula


 
Find out what the papers
said today in Spanish


By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

Here is the section where you can scan short summaries from the Spanish-language press. If you want to know more, just click on a link and you will see and longer summary and have the opportunity to read the entire news story on the page of the Spanish-language newspaper but translated into English.

Translations may be a bit rough, but software is improving every day.

When you see the Summary in English of news stories not covered today by A.M. Costa Rica, you will have a chance to comment.

This is a new service of A.M. Costa Rica called Costa Rica Report. Editor is Daniel Woodall, and you can contact him HERE!

From the Costa Rican press
News items posted Monday through Friday by 8 a.m.
Click a story for the summary









Costa Rican summaries are disabled
on archived pages.























Have you seen these stories?
From A.M. Costa Rica



Top stories are disabled on archived pages.








nameplate
Del Rey casino

top stories



Home
Tourism
Place
classified ad

Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us

What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007  and 2008 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details


Vamos car rental

A.M.
Costa Rica
third newspage


Home
Tourism
Calendar
Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us
San José, Costa Rica, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010, Vol. 10, No. 202

Latigo K-9

More delays on autopista, but Ruta 32 has been reopened
By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

The good news is that specialists finished their work Tuesday on Ruta Nacional 32 and the vital highway will not be closed this morning as planned.

Meanwhile, the highway ministry said that the stretch of the Autopista del Sol between Atenas and Orotina will be closed for at least three more days.

The work on Ruta 32 was to develop a three-dimensional representation of the shelf road that winds through Parque Nacional Braulio Carrillo. The highway has been the scene of many slides, in part because the cliffs above the two-lane road are so steep.  Officials are working to reduce the danger. The highway is the main connector between the Central Valley and province of Limón. The highway is used heavily by trucks headed to the docks in Limón with produce and other loads for export.

The work on the autopista del Sol is more straight forward. Heavy rains washed out a section of the road, and the concession holder of the highway is putting in two bailey bridges to span the gap. One is 48 meters (157 feet) and the other is 60 meters 197 feet). The longer outside span carries traffic eastward.
The outside span still is not stable, and workers will have to install three more pilings to carry the load of the bridge, said the Consejo Nacional de Concessions.

The inside span has been tested with heavy trucks and declared safe.

The location is at Kilometer 47 of the highway. Traffic is being detoured around the problem area.

The concession holder also reported that workers have completed more work to protect motorists from landslides. Some retaining walls were repaired, too.

The company also has presented to the Ministerio de Obras Públicas y Transportes a long-term plan to keep the road in safe condition.

The ministry said that the road might remain closed longer than three days if it appears that there still are safety issues.

Meanwhile, the ministry reported that once the bridge work is completed, no tolls will be collected at the Orotina plaza until the company is able to fix the highway permanently and remove the bailey bridges. The bridges are government property.


Wreck of crashed drug plane yields another kilo of coke
By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

Law officers found one more package of presumed cocaine as they dismantled a small plane Tuesday.

This is the aircraft that crashed in the Río Torres in La Uruca Sunday morning and yielded 172 kilos of cocaine. Now the total is 173, officials said. Some packages are believed to have been swept away by the river current.

Meanwhile, the vice minister of transporte aéreo y maritimo potuario said that the government must exert a more rigorous control over international and local air traffic.

The vice minster is Luis Carlos Araya, and he is among the public officials belatedly suggesting actions to hamper drug transportation. The vice minster was not specific, but local air flights are not now subject to the same kind of inspection that officials conduct for international flights.

The drug-laden plane took off from Tobias Bolaños airport in Pavas. It had been inspected, but the drugs were not
 found in a wing tank until after the crash. The copilot died, and the pilot continues to survive despite critical injuries. Investigators said that the drugs may not have been put on the plane until after the routine inspection.

The drug plane was headed to Guatemala.

The origin of the drugs still is not known. Initial speculation was that the substance had come in on a local flight from Quepos, hence the vice minister's comments.

Some officials have expressed the fear that tightening up controls at public airports will cause smugglers to use private strips that are out of sight of officials. In Honduras, smugglers are landing their crafts on remote highways and in other unanticipated locations.

The anti-drug police said Tuesday that they had confiscated more than $125,000 in various currencies from two men caught trying to leave the county into Nicaragua without passing through police and immigration controls. They are officers of the corporation that owned the wrecked plane.

de rey ad

You need to see Costa Rican tourism information HERE!

Home
Tourism
Place
classified ad

Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us

What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007  and 2008 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details


October special

A.M. Costa Rica
fourth news page

renes law firm
Home
Tourism
Calendar
Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us
San José, Costa Rica, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010, Vol. 10, No. 202


Paula appears to be a non-threat for Costa Rican weather

By the A.M. Costa Rica staff
and wire service reports

Like a mushroom, Hurricane Paula has popped up along the Central American coast. The storm seems to be far enough north so as not to be an indirect threat to Costa Rica.

The country is coming off five days of good weather after unrelenting storms that caused many slides and damaged infrastructure.

Paula has strengthened as it threatens the Gulf Coast of Mexico and parts of Central America, forcing officials to call for the evacuation of many coastal areas.

At last report at 10 p.m. Tuesday, forecasters at the U.S. National Hurricane Center said Paula's maximum sustained winds were 160 kph (100 mph).  Further strengthening is expected. The storm had strengthened since midday.

The storm is about 115 kilometers (about 70 miles) southeast of the Mexican resort island of Cozumel, where hurricane warnings are in effect.  It is expected to approach the east coast of the Yucatan Peninsula.

Hurricane Paula could dump eight to 15 centimeters (three to six inches) of rain over western and central Cuba, the Yucatan Peninsula and northern Belize, with some isolated areas receiving more than 25 centimeters (10 inches)

Forecasters say the heavy rains could trigger flash flooding and mudslides in the region, especially in mountainous parts of Nicaragua and Honduras.
Paula
U.S. National Hurricane Center
Paula seems to be far enough north to have littel effect on Costa Rica's weather

The Instituto Meteorológico Nacional said that winds
would return to drive away rain in the north Pacific and the northern zone. This condition also means an increase in rain in the northern mountains and in the Central Valley, the weather institute said.

The central and southern Pacific would share the afternoon downpours that will be found in the Central Valley. The Caribbean will have sprinkles, the institute said.

The Central Valley got rain Tuesday afternoon, ending a five-day mostly dry spell in the center of San José.



More restrictions on firearms draws opposing opinions

By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

Two views on firearms surfaced at a legislative hearing Tuesday.

One witness maintained that bearing arms was a concession by the state. She was Elizabeth Fonseca. Her view was challenged by Ricardo Guardia, who maintained that the right to bear arms is a constitutional right.

The U.S. Supreme Court has found that possessing a firearm for self protection is a human right.

Ms. Fonseca is the president of the Partido Acción Ciudadana. Guardia has been associated with hunting organizations and now promotes access for everyone.

The two were commenting on a reform of various sections
of the arms and explosives law. The proposal prohibits the manufacture of any type of firearm in Costa Rica or components.

Minors would be excluded without exception from using firearms. There also would be more restrictions on issuing firearms permits.

The revisions are supported by the Chinchilla administration. The testimony was before the Comisión Permanente Especial de Seguridad y Narcotráfico, which is likely to pass the bill onto the full legislature.

Lawmakers heard that violence against persons, mainly robberies, increased 116 percent from 1990 to 2000.

Firearms were used in more than half of these crimes during 2003, lawmakers heard.


Home
Tourism
Place
classified ad

Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us

What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2010 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details



A.M.
Costa Rica
fifth news page
For your international reading pleasure:

News of Nicaragua
News of Central America
News of Cuba      News of Venezuela
News of Colombia    
News of Panamá
News of El Salvador

News of Honduras
News of the Dominican Republic
News of Bolivia     News of Ecuador
Home
Tourism
Calendar
Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us
San José, Costa Rica, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010, Vol. 10, No. 202

Medical vacations in Costa Rica

Oregon considers legalizing
marijuana retail operations

By the A.M. Costa Rica wire services

Oregon is one of 14 U.S. states that allows its citizens to use marijuana for medical purposes. But they can't legally buy the drug. They have to grow it themselves or find a caregiver to grow it for them. 

A measure on this November's ballot would change that by following California's lead in allowing storefront pot sales.  California has hundreds of medical marijuana dispensaries, but sponsors of Oregon's Measure 74 say their proposal takes a more conservative approach.

It's late afternoon at The Green Heart, a medical marijuana dispensary where a steady stream of customers comes in the door of the basement shop. They sit in a waiting room until a clerk examines their ID. Once approved, they're invited into a second curtained-off room to make their purchase.

"We got some joints," says the sales clerk. "Did you want one? I know you're a joint guy."

In just over 10 minutes, a half-dozen customers buy nearly $240 worth of pot.

One of them is Army veteran Tim Scarborough, who says he injured his knee during a training accident. He says marijuana helps control the pain. And he says he can't grow this much at home.

"This place is a convenience," says Scarborough. "Right now my plants aren't even close to being mature to harvest. I still have another month, month and a half before I could do that."

Another customer, Terri Barton, says she has bipolar disorder, but admits she's been using pot since her early teens, long before California voters approved medical marijuana in 1996. She says it's much easier to shop at the dispensary than buy it on the street. Barton believes marijuana helps her condition, but can't explain how.

"I don't know the details of the plant. It's medicine for me," she says. "I buy it in a little sack, and I consume it by smoking it." Turning to the clerk, she asks, "Can I get three grams of the cheapest you got?"

The Green Heart is one of three marijuana dispensaries in this northern California town. It's a different story just up the road in Yreka, where the city council has banned them altogether. City Manager Steve Baker says dispensaries don't fit the family-friendly image the city is trying to create.

"We're looking at a storefront where people advertise," says Baker. "They're encouraging the use, possibly, well beyond the original intent of the use of medical marijuana."

That's the argument law enforcement organizations are making in Oregon. Sheriffs, police chiefs and district attorneys say giving the green light to marijuana storefronts will lead to more abuse of the drug by making it more available.

Clatsop County Sheriff Tom Bergin says medical pot dispensaries can be targets for crime. But that isn't his only problem with Measure 74.

"Is this about pain or is this about profit?" asks Bergin. "The final outcome, what they're really hoping for, is just total legality of another drug into our society."

In fact, California is about to go one step further. In November, voters will decide whether to legalize marijuana - and not just for medical purposes. However, supporters of the Oregon dispensary measure say that's not on the agenda here.

They point to Measure 74's safeguards against abuse: criminal background checks for employees while dispensaries and growers would have to register with the state. That's not required in California. And unlike California, medical marijuana users in Oregon are required to carry state-issued cards.

One of Measure 74's chief petitioners, Alice Ivany, says Oregon can learn from what she sees as California's mistakes.

"We're trying to legitimize this. We're trying to take the concern away from the public with having inspections on these specific gardens. We're having dispensaries inspected."

It's also about compensation. The state would get a 10 percent cut of dispensary marijuana sales.
News from the BBC up to the minute







BBC news and sports feds are disabled on archived pages
BBC sports news up to the minute




Casa Alfi

Home
Tourism
Place
classified ad

Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us

What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007  and 2008 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details
 

A.M. Costa Rica
sixth news page

Looking for a story from a past edition?

See our search page
or
http://www.amcostaricaarchives.com

Home
Tourism
Calendar
Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us
San José, Costa Rica, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010, Vol. 10, No. 202


Latin American news
Please reload page if feed does not appear promptly
Rescue of miners  may take
up to 48 hours to complete


By the A.M. Costa Rica wire services

Chilean rescuers have begun pulling out 33 miners trapped underground by a cave-in for more than two months.  Officials say the entire rescue operation may take as long as 48 hours to complete.

Rescue crews cheered as the first miner was pulled to the surface aboard a rescue hatch painted in red, white and blue — the colors of the Chilean national flag.

The first man to surface was Florencio Ávalos, a 31-year-old miner with two children who has worked at San Jose for more than three years.  He was working alongside his younger brother, Renan, at the time of an Aug. 5 cave-in which trapped the two men and 31 others.

Ávalos embraced his family, rescue workers and Chile's President Sebastián Piñera, before he was taken by doctors for a series of medical exams.

Piñera traveled to the San Jose mine Tuesday to monitor the operation and thank rescue crews who have been working for more than two months to free the trapped men. He also met with relatives of the miners and joined in singing alongside rescue crews, as they awaited the start of the operation.

After the first rescue, Piñera told reporters that rescuing the 33 miners has been the main focus of his government, during the past two months.

The president says his government had vowed to search for the miners until they were found and, now, officials were making good on the promise to bring them home safe and sound.

Officials approved the rescue operation, late Tuesday, after performing extensive tests for two days on an Austrian-built winch and the rescue hatch, known as the Phoenix.

Chile's Navy built three versions of the rescue hatch, which is equipped with oxygen and a hands-free telephone system to communicate with rescuers on the surface. The Phoenix has a metal cage to hold passengers and shock-absorbing wheels on the outside to help it travel up and down inside the rescue shaft.

The Phoenix's first trip into the mine carried Manuel González, a veteran miner, who is helping the men to operate the hatch and prepare for their ascent. A video camera inserted into the mine showed González embracing each of the miners as he stepped off the Phoenix. Three other rescuers are to descend into the mine, in part to assist miners who are weak or ill.

Mining Minister Laurence Golborne has said the entire rescue operation may take up to 48 hours, as the Phoenix can complete a trip into the mine in a few minutes to an hour.

Golborne says officials have determined in which order the miners should come up, in part based on health conditions, but says the rescue team may alter it as needed. He says the first four miners to surface are those in good health, who can help operate the rescue equipment.  He says rescuers have the list of names, but they will evaluate each miner, individually, and decide when he is ready to come to the surface.

The trapped miners range in age from 19 to 63 and many come from families with a history of mining — one of Chile's key industries. All of the miners are Chilean nationals, except for Carlos Mamani, a Bolivian who had worked at the San Jose mine for five days before the accident occurred.

Bolivian President Evo Morales also was expected to travel to the mine, Wednesday, to greet the Bolivian miner, who is viewed as a hero back home.

The men have survived underground longer than any other people trapped in a mining accident in the world.  After the cave-in, the miners were cut off from the surface for 17 days, until a drilling crew managed to locate them.







Latin American news feeds are disabled on archived pages.


Home
Tourism
Place
classified ad

Classifieds
Entertainment
Real estate
Rentals
Sports
About us

What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007  and 2008 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details