free webpage hit counter
A.M. Costa Rica's
sixth news page


San José, Costa Rica, Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, Vol. 15, No. 41
Sports
Calendar
Opinion
Classifieds
Real Estate
Lifestyle
Food
About us



Page 1 is HERE!   Page 2 is HERE!  
Page 3 is  HERE!
  Page 4 is HERE! 
Page 5 is HERE!   Page 7 is HERE!
Sports is  HERE!
   Opinion is HERE!  
Classifieds are HERE! 
Plus useful links

Next
Page


Calendar is
here!

Food
Lifestyle

News from the BBC up to the minute

Latin news from the BBC up to the minute

Health officials laud tobacco pact

By the Pan American Health Organization news staff

Despite fierce opposition from the tobacco industry, a number of countries in the Americas have made major progress in implementing the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. This week marks a decade since the agreement took effect as the world's first international health treaty.

"Ten years ago, establishing smoke-free environments, requiring graphic warnings on tobacco packages, banning tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship, and increasing tobacco taxes all seemed like a pipe dream," said Carissa F. Etienne, director of the Pan American Health Organization. "Now it's a reality. Tobacco — one of the world's deadliest consumer products — has been exposed, and the 10th anniversary of that feat marks a true public health milestone."

Tobacco is the only legal consumer product that kills up to half of those who use it as intended by the manufacturer. Worldwide, it kills one person every six seconds. Tobacco use is a risk factor for six of the eight leading causes of death worldwide and a shared risk factor for all four of the most common noncommunicable diseases: cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic respiratory disease and diabetes.

To counter the devastating impact of the global tobacco epidemic, World Health Organization member countries adopted the convention in 2003, and it went into force on Feb. 27, 2005. A legally binding agreement, it sets forth a series of measures to reduce tobacco demand and supply, ranging from increased taxes on cigarettes and smoke-free public spaces to mandatory graphic health warnings and bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship.

Full implementation of the agreement would lead to an estimated 30 percent reduction in the prevalence of tobacco use in people aged 15 and over and would contribute substantially to the global target of reducing premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases by 25 percent by 2025, said the Pan American Health Organization.

In the Americas, 30 of 35 countries have to date ratified the convention. Regional progress in implementing the treaty's provisions includes:

    * 17 countries in the Americas have passed laws banning smoking in indoor workplaces and public places — a measure that protects nonsmokers from secondhand smoke and also helps smokers to quit.

    * 17 countries require tobacco packaging to display large graphic health warnings that show the harmful health effects of tobacco use.

    * Six countries in the region have banned all forms of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship.

    * Countries including Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Grenada, Mexico, Panamá, St. Lucia, Suriname, Uruguay and Venezuela have increased taxes on tobacco, reducing the affordability of tobacco products. Costa Rica and Panamá are using the extra revenues to pay for health programs.

    * Five countries, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Panama and Uruguay, are on track toward full implementation of the convention, having implemented the majority of a package of six most-effective measures to reduce tobacco use, identified by World Health to help countries fulfill their commitments under the convention.

Much of this progress in the Americas has been achieved despite active opposition from the tobacco industry, which has sought to halt, delay or dilute convention implementation by lobbying lawmakers and especially through litigation.

Tobacco maker Philip Morris is fighting Uruguayan regulations that require health warnings to cover 80 percent of the main surface of tobacco packages and that limit manufacturers to one unique presentation per cigarette brand. Alleging that these measures violate the company's trade rights, Philip Morris took its claim to the World Bank's International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes. The Pan American Health Organization has supported Uruguay's defense of the measures, noting that they are aimed at saving lives and serve as model actions for other countries in the Americas and worldwide.

As part of the convention process, a new protocol to eliminate illicit trade in tobacco products was adopted by World Health member countries in 2012 to address the problem of the illicit tobacco trade, which accounts for one in every 10 cigarettes as well as many other tobacco products, said the Pan American Health Organization.









Costa Rican News
AMCostaRicaArchives.com
Retire NOW in Costa Rica
CostaRicaReport.com
Fine Dining in Costa Rica
The CAFTA Report
Fish fabulous Costa Rica


Page 1 is HERE!   Page 2 is HERE!  
Page 3 is  HERE! 
Page 4 is HERE! 
Page 5 is HERE!  
Page 7 is HERE!
Sports page is  HERE!      Opinion is HERE!  
Classifieds are HERE!       
Plus useful links

Next
Page

Calendar is
here!

Food
Lifestyle

Sports
Calendar
Opinion
Classifieds
Real Estate
Lifestyle
Food
About us
What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado S.A. 2015 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission.
Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details