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San José, Costa Rica, Friday, Oct. 24, 2014, Vol. 14, No. 211
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High altitude early man site found

By the A.M. Costa Rica wire services

A research team led by an assistant professor at the University of Maine in Orono has uncovered what are now the world's highest known Ice Age settlements.

Professor Kurt Rademaker reported the discovery in an article that appeared Thursday in the journal Science. The article describes settlements 4.5 kilometers above sea level in the southern Peruvian Andes that were inhabited at least 12,000 years ago. The site is about 14,700 feet in elevation.

According to Rademaker, researchers have found artifacts, including stone tools, animal bones, food remnants and primitive artwork.

The location of the two sites is within 160 kilometers of the Pacific coast and roughly west of Lake Titicaca in southern Peru.

Rademaker said the tools found include scrapers for working animal hides and implements for cutting and butchering. The professor added, "A lot of the stone tools seem to be all about hunting and processing of animals."

Rademaker said he doubts people lived there year-round because the rainy season at that altitude brings rain, sleet and snow from December to March.

The art on the walls of the rock shelters includes red ochre pictographs of animals with some entire wall sections painted red.

Some experts think people need to make genetic adaptations over many thousands of years to withstand such altitudes. this site may suggest otherwise.


Mexican governor quits over students

By the A.M. Costa Rica wire services

The governor of the Mexican state of Guerrero resigned Thursday, nearly one month after the unresolved disappearance of 43 students that is linked to politicians, police and drugs cartels.

Ángel Aguirre Rivero said on social media that he was confident he had made the responsible decision in stepping down. He added that a regional parliament would choose his replacement.

The students from a rural teachers training college went missing after a confrontation with police in the town of Iguala on Sept. 26. The circumstances that led to the violence remain unclear. However, six people were killed at the scene and dozens were wounded after police and armed civilians opened fire on three buses filled with students.

Authorities have ordered the arrest of Iguala's mayor, his wife and an aide, alleging the trio were the masterminds behind the attack. Dozens of local police and members of the Guerreros Unidos drug gang have been detained in connection with the case.

There has been no word on the missing men. Initial DNA testing shows the charred bodies found in several mass graves in Iguala are not the students.

Ongoing protests around Mexico demand answers from the government, which is under international criticism for human rights abuses committed by security forces.





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