free webpage hit counter
Ship Costa Rica
Hotel and Casino
A.M.
Costa Rica

Your daily
English-language 

news source
Monday through Friday

Pacific Lots
(506) 2223-1327                        Published Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2012, in Vol. 12, No. 33                            Email us
Sports
Calendar
Opinion
Classifieds
Real Estate
Lifestyle
Food
About us
Jo Stuart
Go Dutch rentals

The ATV accident was just the start of the problems
By Andrew Rulseh Kasper
of the A.M. Costa Rica staff

Following a nearly fatal all-terrain-vehicle accident Feb. 10 that left her with three broken limbs and bones protruding from her skin, a Minnesota vacationer was left writhing in a private hospital without treatment until her husband could come up with a down payment of $5,000.

The couple, Ron and Elissa Merritt, had come to Costa Rica a few days earlier to celebrate her birthday. According to Ron Merritt, they saved two years managing their small carpet and flooring business in Minnesota for the funds to travel. After arriving in the country, they decided to go four-wheeling and took off for a popular place near Jacó, which is where the accident took place.

Mrs. Merritt said while driving on the trail a motorbike approached from the opposite direction causing her to veer to the side and fishtail over the edge of a cliff. A tree 70 feet below broke her fall when it snagged her leg. She said if it hadn't been for the tree and the helmet, she probably would have fallen the remainder of the distance and died. It was her first time on an all-terrain-vehicle.

Cruz Roja responders from Jacó arrived more than an hour later to the scene. One responder classified the site as popular and usually dangerous for tourists. The agency typically receiving two to three calls a month for similar accidents in the area, he said. The medical technicians had to extract Elissa Merritt vertically for 20 meters before they could move her by ground.

After a 45-minute ride down the mountain, Mrs. Merritt arrived at a clinic in Jacó, where she said attendants took one look at her and said she was too injured for them to help. She was then taken in a private ambulance to Hospital CIMA in Escazú more than two hours away where attendants demanded the money to admit her, said her husband. A CIMA administrator confirmed Tuesday that because the hospital is private, staffers require a down payment before providing treatment.

Merritt said he was able to call his brother in the United States that night and have him wire $5,000 so his wife could immediately undergo stabilizing treatment for her two broken arms and broken legs. But their troubles didn't end there.

Sunday, the staff at CIMA requested $10,000 more to cover an initial surgery, Merritt said, but the couple didn't have any more money. A doctor said his wife still needed another surgery, which would cost $25,000 more, Merritt said. He said they have insurance coverage in the United States and  proposed flying back to the United States for the
The Merritts
Merritt photo used with permission
Ron and Elissa Merritt

 surgery, but CIMA doctors would not clear his wife for a commercial flight because she had blood clots in her lungs.

Monday CIMA said he owed $20,000 in total for only the first surgery and said if he didn't pay they would be kicked out of the hospital within 24 to 48 hours. Merritt said. His wife was fitted with external metal braces and couldn't walk, he added.

Tuesday Merritt said a medical evacuation flight was pre-approved by the couple's insurance provider in the United States. At that point he said he was told by a CIMA staffer that he and his wife wouldn't be allowed to leave without payment. He said he was worried they would fight him in leaving

“It almost feels like extortion,” Merritt said.

However, Tuesday night, the couple had safely left the hospital, according to CIMA staff. And according to family members, a medical evacuation flight from the United States was on its way to retrieve them.

He said much of the medical outlay would be reimbursed by the stateside insurance firm. Then he said he would see that Hospital CIMA received the additional money it was due.

As an aside, Merritt said he could not document his wife's injuries photographically because someone who stopped to help her at the accident scene walked off with her camera.

The problem tourists have with accidents is a continuing one. Mrs. Merritt is only the latest to face medical and financial problems while visiting here. In contrast, starting last year, Panamá decided to provide medical coverage to all visitors who arrived at its  Tocumen international airport for the first 30 days they were in the country.


Find more about Weather in San Jose, CS
Today's
colon
exchange rate
HERE!
Subscribe
to our
daily digest

Search
our site

Real estate ads
Classified
ads

Tourism and
services

Display
ad info

Classified
ad info

Contact us
Daystar Rentals
Del Rey king's club
CoCoMar 020312

Residency in Cost aRica
Great Sunrise

90210 Smile
HRG advertising
Merry Maids

Ship to Costa Rica

rss feed graphic
Twitter link
Facebook graphic
Have you seen our crossword puzzle?
HERE!


Association of Residents of Costa Rica

Web design

HRG

Casa Roland

Latigo K9

What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
Sports
Calendar
Opinion
Classifieds
Real Estate
Lifestyle
Food
About us
Jo Stuart
The contents of this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2012 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for more details


Smile 90210
A.M. Costa Rica's  Second news page
San José, Costa Rica, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2012, Vol. 12, No. 33
Sports
Calendar
Opinion
Classifieds
Real Estate
Lifestyle
Food
About us
Jo Stuart

Costa Rica Expertise

Casa de habano

Sportsmen's Lodge

Professional Directory
A.M. Costa Rica's professional directory is where business people who wish to reach the English-speaking community may invite responses. If you are interested in being represented here, please contact the editor.


Residency experts

Residency in Costa Rica
A full service immigration agency
U.S. and San José offices
Getting and authenticating documents can be a chore —

we know how to do it. Experienced with many nationalities. Up-to-date on
Costa Rica's evolving immigration law.
Pensionado and rentista. Your first stop for smooth, professional service and a positive experience. Javier Zavaleta jzava@pacbell.net
www.residencyincostarica.com
Tel: (323) 255-6116
7140-3/6/12


Legal services

KEARNEY-LAWSON & Asoc.
Lic.Gregory Kearney Lawson.
Attorneys at Law and real estate brokers
Relocation services, Wedding Planning
Greg Kearney
*Investments  *Corporations
*Tax Shelters *Immigration
*Real Estate Sales in Costa Rica
*Name & Product registration
*Business procedures 
*Family and Labor Law
*Locate People   *Private Investigations
Phone/Fax: 2290-8117, 8841-0007
New location on Rohrmoser Blvd.
 Phone: (506) 2232-1014
6966-7/31/12


CONSULTORIA JURIDICA EMPRESARIAL CA, S.A
Attorneys & Notaries
 Tel.  2280-9692 / 2225-9322
Skype: CONJURIDICA
e-mail: info@conjuridica.com 
Web:  www.conjuridica.com
       We offer the highest professional standards with very competitive rates. All our official documentation and Notary deeds are always translated in English for better comprehension, client satisfaction and safety.
consultoria logo
• Immigration Law.
• Real Estate Law.
• Corporations, Foundations
       and Associations. 
• Trademarks & Intellectual
       Property.  
• Notary public services
• Criminal Law
•Civil & Commercial 
       Litigation
Our Law Office is conveniently located near Mall San Pedro,  350 meters south from the Subaru dealer, Los Yoses, San José.
7060-4/18/11



Accountants

U.S. Tax International

Plus Costa Rican taxes, accounting, and legal services
Over 15 years in Costa Rica
(English Spoken)
C.R. 2288-2201   U.S 786-206-9473
FAX: 2231-3300
E-mail: ustax@lawyer.com
Web page with vital U.S. tax info HERE!
6991-2/20/110

James Brohl, C.P.A. & M.B.A.
US Income Tax,  US GAAP Accounting
& Business Consulting

Uncle Sam's hat
• US Tax return preparation  for
individuals and businesses
• eFile returns: secure with faster refunds
• Assist with back reporting and other filing issues
• Take advantage of the Foreign
Income Tax Exclusion (up to $
92,900 in 2011}
• Business Consulting to facilitate working in Costa Rica
• Accounting for US and International Financial Reporting


Telephone 8305-3149 or 2256-8620
E-mail jrtb_1999@yahoo.com
6752-3/31/12


Language education

If I Can Learn To Speak Spanish, Anybody Can!

It is very important that as residents of Costa Rica, we at least learn to speak basic Spanish, especially at the bank,supermarket, etc. We at Epifania Spanish School want to help you.  Our teachers are all courteous professionals and will teach you basic Spanish as well as Spanish you 
SPanish school presidentJames DeRoy
president, Epifania
Epifania
can  start using immediately.

 Conveniently located in Curridabat the Spanish Program for Residents consists of two hours per day, two days per week. Regular Price per month is $200. During September, October and November we have a Special Promotion. 2 for1 – Two Students for One Price.
Ep;ifania graphic
If you want more info, visit our Web site  Epifania School or call us at 2524-1726 for complete details.
7253-2/16/12


Real estate agents and services

CR Beach logo

Jeff Fisher, 18-year CR resident & Owner-Broker of CR Beach Investment Real Estate is
 
pleased to announce the hiring of his new licensed realtor, Peter Van Hussen, former owner of Hotel Canciones del Mar, and long-time Jaco-CR resident.
 Peter, who speaks 5 languages, will join Colin, Frances and Junior in helping clients like you find their dream properties in  the New Jaco-Central Pacific area. Let CR Beach show you why this is still the best area for you to  invest-retire-enjoy! 
 Fire sale Deal of the Week: $209,000 Hermosa Beach Bungalow Sunset Special!
Member of the N.A.R., the Costa Rican Real Estate Board CRGAR and the Central Pacific Chamber of Commerce.
www.CRbeach.com    info@crbeach.com
Toll Free: 1-888-782-1119 
Office: 2643-4334, 2643-3672
Located in the heart of Jacó. IL Galeone Center, Jacó, Costa Rica
7158-3/20/12

MARGARET SOHN
with Great Estates of Costa Rica

20 years Costa Rican
real estate experience

Member of the Costa Rican Real Estate Association, Lic. #1000

Member of
Costa Rican-American Chamber of Commerce

info@realtorcostarica.com
www.realtorcostarica.com
(506)  2220-3729 &  (506)
8333-8391 cell
(506)  2232-5016 (phone/fax)
6978-1/16/12

Latitude Nine real estate graphic
Latitude 9
Real Estate, Development, Investments.

Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica
506 2777-1197

Over 25 years experience in Costa Rica

www.latitude9.com
7172-6/1/12

Dentistry

Dr. Vargas logo
Dental implants in Costa Rica
Call us: Within C.R.  2225-1189
From USA    1-866-7060-248
Please visit: www.cit-team.com
7218-1/28/12

Marco Cavallini & Associates
Dental Implants and Crowns

Dr. Marco A. Muñoz Cavallini has placed and restored
DR. Cavallini
Dr. Marco A. Muñoz Cavallini
over 17,000 dental implants since 1980. The Dr. Marco Muñoz Cavallini Dental Clinic, is recognized as one of the best practices in Dental Reconstruction, Dental Implant placement and Cosmetic Dentistry in Costa Rica and the World. For more information, visit us today at: marcomunozcavallini.com
6822-5/8/12
Fire fighters ready to begin
new station in Los Chiles


By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

The nation's fire fighters will begin construction this month of the first fire station to be financed by a new tax. The station will be in Los Chiles in northern Costa Rica. The municipality there has donated the land not far from the Hospital de Los Chiles, said the Cuerpo de Bomberos.

Lawmakers recently passed a new tax on electrical bills that will generate funds so that the fire fighting agency can build a handful of new stations a year and staff them.

Other stations are proposed this year for Puerto Jiménez, Talamanca, Cariari, Monteverde and Nandayure.

The fire fighting agency said that the new station will be inaugurated in April if construction is on schedule.


Woman's death is called
accidental due to a fall


By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

Investigators are classifying a Canadian woman's death at her home in Playa de Cocos as an accident.

The woman, 79-year-old Lorraine Nadon, was found dead at the foot of her stairs in her Las Begonias condominiums where she lived with her husband, the Judicial Investigating Organization reported. Rescue responders said they received the call at about 11:30 a.m. Sunday from the husband. He said he awoke to find his wife dead in the apartment, they said. Officials presume that she fell down the stairs.

When investigators arrived, they said they found no signs of foul play or marks on the body indicating a bullet or knife wound. They say no one has been detained in relation to the case and an autopsy will determine the exact cause of death.


 
Find out what the papers
said today in Spanish


By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

Here is the section where you can scan short summaries from the Spanish-language press. If you want to know more, just click on a link and you will see and longer summary and have the opportunity to read the entire news story on the page of the Spanish-language newspaper but translated into English.

Translations may be a bit rough, but software is improving every day.

When you see the Summary in English of news stories not covered today by A.M. Costa Rica, you will have a chance to comment.

This is a new service of A.M. Costa Rica called Costa Rica Report. Editor is Daniel Woodall, and you can contact him HERE!
From the Costa Rican press
News items posted Monday through Friday by 8 a.m.
Click a story for the summary















Costa Rica news summaries are disabled
on archived pages.



















Have you seen these stories?
From A.M. Costa Rica







Top story news feeds are disabled on archived pages.













Heredia house for sale
Newspaper naemplate

Del Rey page two

Sports
Calendar
Opinion
Classifieds
Real Estate
Lifestyle
Food
About us
Jo Stuart
What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2012 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details


Cocomar Beach Report
Samantha's girls
House raffle ad
A.M. Costa Rica Third News Page
San José, Costa Rica, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2012, Vol. 12, No. 33
Sports
Calendar
Opinion
Classifieds
Real Estate
Lifestyle
Food
About us
Jo Stuart

Study to be launched to seek cause of mystery kidney disease
By Andrew Rulseh Kasper
of the A.M. Costa Rica staff

The Costa Rican government is launching the region's first in-depth study into the mysterious epidemic of kidney failure which has claimed the lives of thousands of sugar cane workers in Central America.

Since it was first identified that high rates of kidney failure exist in the young, male, working populations along the Pacific coast of Central America, many theories have surfaced as to the root of the problem. Although prolonged dehydration is agreed upon in the scientific community as a likely candidate, many others have been proposed.

Some of the others include: exposure to pesticides, from the sugar cane work many of the afflicted participate in, consumption of a homemade liquor that is popular in the rural regions where the problem is most prevalent and chronic consumption of pain medications possibly linked to the aches and pains of a manual labor workforce. Genetics could also play a part, but researchers seem to agree that environmental factors are most likely to blame.

What the Costa Rican study hopes to draw is a more concrete link between one of the possible culprits, or a combination of several, and the affected population. Ray Wong, a health expert based in Liberia, which is directing the study, said other descriptive studies have been done in the region but no associative ones.

He said if everything goes as planned, the pilot study could begin as soon as late March, after it is approved by an ethics committee. It will be conducted through eight clinics in the Guanacaste region, where researchers have determined the biggest problem exists. Guanacaste in northwest Costa Rica is mostly a rural region where many participate in hard labor, especially harvesting of sugar cane.

According to Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social statistics, over the last several years the Guanacaste region has accounted for about 12 percent of the nation's documented kidney failures while it only represents 6 percent of the countries population.

In other words, Wong said, that province is very high-risk in terms of a resident developing a chronic kidney disease.

Wong, himself a Caja physician, said the study will be conducted by doctors in each of the participating clinics who will survey patients with chronic kidney problems with a host
of labor and lifestyle related questions. For every person surveyed with a chronic kidney illness, two healthy patients 
will also be surveyed. The healthy patients will be similar in age, sex, nationality and location, he said.

More than 800 people will be surveyed in total over about 10 months in total, Wong said, adding that he hopes the results will either determine a common thread among the sick or point researchers in the right direction for another study.

Roberto Castro, who works with the Ministerio de Salud and specializes in occupational health, said if conclusive evidence is found, the results could have a direct affect on workplace practices. Castro, also a physician, said he believes the problem
is most likely linked to chronic dehydration. He said the disease has been identified in laborers outside of the sugar cane industry such as construction, possibly ruling out the link to pesticides.  Homemade alcohol consumption more commonly causes neurological effects, he added.

Castro described the kidney as a filter that needs to be purged frequently with an intake of water to remove the toxins. He said a laborer working in the sun can expel two kilograms or 4.4 pounds of water in a day, all which needs to be replaced promptly. Often it is not. He said sugar cane workers also frequently burn the fields before harvest, doubly exposing them to high temperatures inducing dehydration.

Weeks and years of this type of work can have a cumulative affect, he said.

Castro said concrete evidence may result in widespread mandatory changes in labor practices. In the example of chronic dehydration, he said it may mean outdoor work schedules will have to be altered with a mandatory break between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. when the sun is the hottest. Fluids may be more readily available to employees and specific clothing to keep cool may be required, he said.

An analysis of global health data showed that from 2005 to 2009, kidney failure has killed more than 2,800 men a year in the region, according to the Center for Public Integrity, which first reported on the issue in December.

In Costa Rica, death from the disease is up 16 percent from 2005. In El Salvador and Nicaragua over the last two decades, the number of men dying from kidney disease has risen fivefold, according to the report. Now more men are dying from the ailment than from HIV/AIDS, diabetes and leukemia combined, the U.S.-based center added.


Public employees say they plan to stage a general strike today
By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

The country's public employees are poised to go out on strike today, although the percentage that will participate is uncertain.

The so-called general strike is being initiated by the nation's teachers. The Asociación Nacional de Educadores put a litany of demands on its Web site, including the statement that “the fiscal crisis is the responsbility of the politicians and poor fiscal administration that complacently have permitted evasion and excessive exemptions for the most powerful and rich sectors that voraciously accumulate wealth.”

The teachers organization and other union groups have said that they are being penalized because the central government has decreed a 5,000-colon monthly raise for public employees. That's about $10. The union members are upset that the amount is not larger and that negotiations were not allowed to continue.

Those who participate today are expected to assemble in front of the Ministerio de Hacienda, the budgetary agency, on Avenida Segunda before 10 a.m. From there they plan to march to Casa Presidencial in Zapote.
The salary protest has not generated the same fervor among public employees as other issues, but police and telecom workers are likely to join in. They are members of unions affiliated with the Asociación Nacional de Empleados Públicos y Privados, which is supporting the strike.

The strike also is a challenge to President Laura Chinchilla Miranda. Already, one of her ministers, Mario Zamora Cordero, has warned Fuerza Pública officers not to participate in the strike if they are on duty. He is the security minister.
Lately the central government has declined to pay workers for the time they are on strike. That has limited participation.

For expats with children in public schools, there is uncertainty. If enough teachers participate, schools may not function. Some are considering keeping their children home.

Other expats who have reasons to visit public offices might find them well under staffed.

Workers at the public hospitals have had a series of protests and strikes, so their participation today is uncertain. Naturally strike organizers say they have the full support of most public workers.

Del Rey casino

You need to see Costa Rican tourism information HERE!

Sports
Calendar
Opinion
Classifieds
Real Estate
Lifestyle
Food
About us
Jo Stuart
What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2012 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details


A.M. Costa Rica's 
Fourth news page
renes law firm
San José, Costa Rica, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2012, Vol. 12, No. 33
Sports
Calendar
Opinion
Classifieds
Real Estate
Lifestyle
Food
About us
Jo Stuart

Judiciary expresses pleasure at conviction of one of its own
By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

The judiciary issued congratulatory statements Tuesday after an employee in the anti-drug prosecutor's office was sentenced to 10 years in prison. The man, Walter Valverde Fernández, was convicted of leaking inside information to two groups of drug traffickers.

The Poder Judicial issued a long press release along with a photo of the convicted man. However, they also said that a Colombian man tried with Valverde was acquitted of drug charges. Prosecutors will appeal that acquittal, they said.
 
The man who was acquitted is Ricardo Vallejo. He was accused of the same crimes that Valverde faced. Valverde also faced a drug trafficking charge, but the trial tribunal decided that there was insufficient evidence that he was involved in such acts.

The evidence came mainly from an email record and conversations on cellular telephones. Prosecutors said that Valverde leaked confidential information contained in files relating to six cases. The court also concluded that he put in jeopardy the lives of judicial employees.

Valverde was ordered held in preventative detention for six months while the appeals are processed. That is typical in court cases here where a trial court's decision usually has to be ratified by an appeals panel. The case was in the Tribunal de Juicio de San José.
convicted man
Poder Judicial photo
Walter Valverde discusses his case after conviction


U.S. Embassy here joins Washington's defense of drug policies
By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

The U.S. Embassy here is joining the effort to defend Washington's drug policy. The embassy will bring two U.S. experts here by electronic means to discuss the situation with Spanish-language reporters.

They are Eric Siervo, manager for International Programs with Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America in Alexandria, Virginia, and L. Bradley Hittle of the U.S. Office of National Drug Control Policy.

Washington is going on the offensive after Otto Pérez, the new president of Guatemala, suggested over the weekend that the United States might consider decriminalizing drugs as a way to reduce violence in Central America. The U.S. Embassy there quickly issued a statement that said such an action was not a good idea, and now the embassy in Costa Rica is joining in the public relations effort to defend the war on drug.
 Pérez heads a country that has been torn apart by violence and drug cartels. Honduras and El Salvador also are highly violent countries due, in part, to drug gangs. Although criminality is still on the increase in Costa Rica, it has not reached the level of other countries. Much of the violence is due to drug use and gangs.

The U.S. Embassy in Guatemala said that even if gangs did not deal in drugs they would deal in other types of criminality that would continue to cause violence. Washington clams that U.S. Drug use has decreased significantly.

Many Latin leaders have urged the United States to do something about the consumption of drugs that is the end market for traffickers.

The Community Anti-Drug Coalitions also studies teenage drinking, marijuana use and tobacco use, according to its Web site.

Sports
Calendar
Opinion
Classifieds
Real Estate
Lifestyle
Food
About us
Jo Stuart
What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2012 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details


A.M. Costa Rica's
Fifth news page
shopping
San José, Costa Rica, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2012, Vol. 12, No. 33
Sports
Calendar
Opinion
Classifieds
Real Estate
Lifestyle
Food
About us
Jo Stuart

Medical vacations in Costa Rica

Fake Marine brings case
on Valor Act to High Court

By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

The U.S. Supreme Court is being asked to throw out the Stolen Valor Act because it violates free speech. This is the law that penalizes those who claim falsely that they hold U.S. military decorations.

The appeal against the law came from a man named  Xavier Alvarez, an elected official holding a water board post in California, according to the the Legal Information Institute at the Cornell University Law School. Alvarez claimed during a public meeting that he had been a Marine and had been awarded the Medal of Honor. This is the United State's highest award for valor. He was never a Marine.

According to the institute's summary Alvarez challenged the act in U.S. district court, but he received three years probation, community service and a fine anyway. However, the Ninth Circuit court reversed the conviction and held that the Stolen Valor Act is contrary to the free expression guaranteed by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

The U.S. Supreme Court set oral arguments for a week from today. Alvarez is being supported by the American Civil Liberties Union, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and a host of organizations that are First Amendment advocates.


U.N.'s Ban praises treaty
for nuclear-free Latin zone


Special to A.M. Costa Rica

On the 45th anniversary of the treaty that created a nuclear-weapon-free zone in Latin America and the Caribbean, U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon Tuesday hailed the pact as an example of how regional initiatives can advance global norms on nuclear disarmament, non-proliferation and the peaceful use of atomic energy.

“The Treaty of Tlatelolco has earned international recognition as one of the most historic achievements in the history of nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament efforts,” said Ban in a message delivered on his behalf in Mexico City by Sergio Duarte, the U. N. high representative for disarmament affairs.

Latin America and the Caribbean was the first region in the world to establish a nuclear-weapon-free zone with the Treaty of Tlatelolco – named for an area within Mexico City – in 1967.

Ban said the treaty also broke new ground by establishing the Agency for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean as a regional nuclear verification agency with the unique mandate to verify compliance with the obligations of the pact.

“Even more remarkably, it achieved all of this at the height of the Cold War, thereby challenging the notion that nuclear weapons were indispensable in maintaining security,” he said. “These great achievements were the result of unprecedented cooperation among States at the regional level, reinforced by support they received from the world community, in particular the United Nations.”

Building on the success of Treaty of Tlatelolco, the U.N. has actively promoted the establishment of other such regional nuclear-weapon-free zones around the world, the secretary general noted.


Pekingese is best of show
at Westminster competition


By the A.M. Costa Rica wire services

A 4-year-old Pekingese named Malachy has won best in show at the Westminster Kennel Club canine competition in New York City.

Malachy defeated six other dogs to take the top prize Tuesday night at the prestigious annual event for pure bred dogs, a year after finishing in second place. He is the fourth Pekingese to win best in show at Westminster.

Malachy, who won as best toy dog for the second straight year, took home his 115th overall best of show title, and his last. His handler and co-owner David Fitzpatrick says the dog will retire from competition and live out his days chasing squirrels.

More than 2,000 purebred dogs were entered in the two-day Westminster show.


Loan planned for Cachi

By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

The Banco Centroamericano de Integración Económica says it is loaning the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad $140 million to enlarge the Cachi hydro plant in Cartago. The funds will be distributed annually with $42.4 million disbursed each year. The term of the loan is for 16 years.
News from the BBC up to the minute

















BBC news feeds are disabled on archvied pages.

































Latin news from the BBC up to the minute









































Some of our other titles:
A.M. Panama
A.M. Colombia
A.M. Guatemala
A.M. Honduras
A.M. Havana
A.M. Nicaragua
A.M. Venezuela
A.M. Central America
A.M.
Dominican Republic

A.M. Ecuador A.M. San Salvador
A.M. Bolivia

Sports
Calendar
Opinion
Classifieds
Real Estate
Lifestyle
Food
About us
Jo Stuart
What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2012 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details


A.M. Costa Rica's
sixth news page

Looking for a story from a past edition?

See our search page
or
http://www.amcostaricaarchives.com
San José, Costa Rica, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2012, Vol. 12, No. 33
Sports
Calendar
Opinion
Classifieds
Real Estate
Lifestyle
Food
About us
Jo Stuart

Costa Rica Reprot promo


Latin America news
Guide to 1,300 tropical fish
now an iTunes application


By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

Now there is no excuse not to know those fish. In both languages.

A Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute expert has created an iPhone application that contains bilingual species identifications, the institute said.

The potential users are divers, scientists and tour guides, the institute said. The electronic application contains information on about 1,300 fish species. The institute said that is about 10 percent of the world's tropical fish.

The area covered by the application is from Baja California to Ecuador and the Galapagos. The application by D. Ross Robertson is based on the 1994 book “Fishes of the Tropical Eastern Pacific,” by Gerald R. Allen and Robertson.

The application is available through iTunes as “Fishes: East Pacific. An identification guide for the shorefish fauna of the tropical eastern Pacific,”  the Panamá-based institute said.


Agents search an office
at Municipalidad de Escazú


By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

Judicial agents searched an office of the Municipalidad de Escazú Tuesday as part of an investigation into the issuance of construction permits.

The investigation began in August and involves nine employees of the municipality, said the Judicial Investigating Organization. There have been no arrests. The case is being handled by the fraud investigators. The case involves the issuance of permits that involve the Area de Protección Quebrada Jaboncillo, said the judicial agency.


Construction expo to open

By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

Expo Construcción y Vivienda 2012 begins this evening at the Centro de Eventos Pedregal in Belén, Heredia. The expo is sponsored by the Cámera Costarricense de Construcción. Organizers said that there will be 570 separate exhibits. The expo runs through Sunday, and Saturday and Sunday are days with paid admission.


Animal adoptions offered

By the A.M. Costa Rica staff

The Asociacion Animales de Asis will hold an adoption fair for cats and dogs Saturday at the Automercado in Heredia from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.









Latin American news feeds are disabled on archived pages.


Costa Rican News
AMCostaRicaArchives.com
Retire NOW in Costa Rica
CostaRicaReport.com

Sports
Calendar
Opinion
Classifieds
Real Estate
Lifestyle
Food
About us
Jo Stuart
What we published this week: Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Earlier
The contents of this page and this Web site are copyrighted by Consultantes Río Colorado 2012 and may not be reproduced anywhere without permission. Abstracts and fair use are permitted.  Check HERE for details